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The Intersection of Science, Art, Music & Humanities

Happy St. Patrick's Day

Sunday, March 17, 2019


On this day set aside to celebrate St. Patrick green, we feature the sweet magic of Irish tunes and the prophetic messaging of Welsh poetry. 


Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.


Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.


Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.


And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.


Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.


~Dylan Thomas


Many scholars now credit this portentous poem with addressing rage over the gradual loss of passion for life, as well as ill-planned metaphoric crossings of the Rubicon (irrevocable steps toward an environmental point of no return).


Ellen Troyer with Spencer Thornton, MD, David Amess and the Biosyntrx staff